Your Guide To South Australia’s Peninsula Camping

Let’s talk the South Australian Coast. Why do people go there and what’s all the fuss about?

It’s like this. You’ve got your sunnies on. The sun is out. You are getting a nice driver’s arm tan and smelling that fresh salt air, looking out over that big blue ocean.

Driving around the peninsulas of South Australia is an experience. From the views to the people and the food. And if you love seafood, keep on reading.

Heading down south can be a bit tricky when you’ve got to pack the car and drive down in a cramped SUV or 4WD. However, we’ve got the perfect solution to that – a camper trailer from the Mars team.

Camper trailers are the easiest way to take all of your camping gear and equipment from home to highway. You don’t need to sit with bags on your lap or spend hours pitching a tent and packing up when you’ve got a camper trailer. Take a look at our range.

Family enjoying by the beach in the night with a camper

The Eyre Peninsula

There are 3 peninsulas in South Australia to visit. The Eyre Peninsula is the largest of the 3 but is perhaps the most confusing. Here’s a little map to get your bearings. The Eyre Peninsula is broken down into 4 distinct sections.

1. Lower Eyre
2. Eastern Eyre
3. Western Eyre
4. Central Eyre

Roaming The Lower Eyre

The Lower Eyre is the most touristy of the 3 sections, mainly because of its nickname ‘Australia’s seafood frontier’. With 2,000 kilometres of coastline to draw from, we are talking seafood pulled from pristine water. Mussels, oysters, prawn, kingfish, snapper…the list goes on.

The local restaurants offer all types of seafood caught straight from the peninsula to ensure maximum freshness and quality; that alone is the reason why many people head down south.

It must be said though that the sea life isn’t just for eating though. The peninsula is an aquatic hub for all thing’s dolphins, sharks and sea lions. You can swim with all three of these creatures if you’re lucky.

There are 4 major destinations in Lower Eyre:

1. Coffin Bay — the place to go for oysters and the Coffin Bay lookout
2. Cummins — a historic flour mill town with a 1950s Australia feel
3. Port Lincoln — the seafood capital with fish being caught in Port Lincoln
4. Tumby Bay — many trails to walk like the mangrove boardwalk and foreshore walk

There are some fantastic camping options in both Coffin Bay and Port Lincoln for those who want the full taste of the South Australian peninsula. We recommend:

Big Yangie, Coffin Bay — a secluded shoreline sanctuary that’s very peaceful
Black Springs, Coffin Bay — a private shell beach that’s good for exploring
Carcase Rock, Port Lincoln — a coastal tree beach that’s great in the summer

Heading Along The Eastern Eyre Peninsula

The Eastern Eyre offers many cultural things to see and do. Have you ever thought about swimming with giant cuttlefish? You can do that up near Whyalla between May and August.

Port Neil is a great family getaway with picnic options along the coastline with local food options and the freshest seafood just a few minutes’ walk from the beach. Enjoy scenic drives and the second largest conservation park in the Eyre Peninsula.

Cowell is where you need to go if you’re into fishing. There are 48 square kilometres of clear water where you can catch snappers, garfish, flathead and many other types of sea creatures. If you’re lucky, you might find a crab.

Cleve is an agricultural heritage town. 4 scenic trails take you into the woodlands of the great Australia outback. These trails are so authentic and untouched it can be difficult to find, but when you do, you’ll consider it worthwhile.

Arno Bay is the right choice if you’re looking for a relaxing beach town. There’s plenty of campsites in and around the beaches to maximise your time on the sand.

CTA Mars Campers Buying Guide

What’s On The West Coast?

The west coast of the Eyre Peninsula is broken up into the west coast and the far west coast (The Nullarbor). However, this time around we’ll focus on just the west coast and save the Nullarbor for another time.

The western side of this peninsula is for the adventurers and go-getters. This side of the peninsula is very popular with all things water sports related. If you’re looking for a good spot to try out your surfboard or kayak, then this is the place. Otherwise, there are many places to rent one for the day if you feel like you’re missing out.

Inland towards the Central Eyre Peninsula

Central Eyre Peninsula is home to red earth and blue skies that mark the classic Australian outback we know and love. It’s a great blend of sweeping farmland and untouched natural reserves.

Explore the unique Organ Pipes National Park, where you can see the natural phenomenon created by the volcanic eruptions— they actually do look like organ pipes.

You don’t get more Australian than a family owned sheep station at Mt Ive Station. It’s a historic building with kangaroos and campsites available. It doesn’t get more authentic than staying at a sheep station surrounded by kangaroos and the great Aussie outback.

Camping at Gawler Ranges National Park can’t be overlooked. The rocky gorges and valleys were created 1,500 million years ago. These granite hills and grassy plains are just begging to be camped on. Relax under the stars at night and wake up to the bird songs of the Australian bush.

Camper with a SUV in green jungle

The Fleurieu Peninsula

Just 40 minutes out from Adelaide is Fleurieu Peninsula, home to some of Australia’s best wine. This peninsula is full of recreational activities so it can be difficult deciding which ones to pick.

While there’s a lot on year-round in Fleurieu Peninsula, the arts and culture, local markets, sports and wildlife experiences can’t be missed if you’re visiting this coastline.

Arts and culture

The Fleurieu Peninsula has a strong connection to the traditions of the Ngarrindjeri, which can be seen through the sculptures, paintings, glasswork and performances seen through the peninsula’s cooperatives, galleries and restaurants.

Markets

This peninsula might be famous for its wine, but the countryside was built off the backs of strong and sustainable farming, which in turn has provided some very tasty food for the locals to enjoy. So why should you miss out?

Friday, Saturday and Sunday markets flourish with bread, cured meats and handmade cheeses to try and buy. There’s plenty more where that came from but the region is well known for meats and dairy. Willunga is renowned for its almonds and olive oil, whereas Mount Compass is known for its blueberries, poultry and cheeses.

Sports and adventure

It makes sense for a peninsular to contain many water sports and this one is no different. At almost every town you’ll find surfing, jet-skiing, kayaking, canoeing and just about every other boat or water sport related activity.

For those living life on the dangerous side, you’ll find paintballing and skydiving options in the peninsula as well. However, for those who like a good view without the fear of death, there are joy flights inside historic planes and helicopters as well.

Wildlife

If you’re lucky, you’ll be able to spot some whales, dolphins, seals, penguins and sea dragons along this coast. You can take guided tours, but the real excitement comes from driving down the coast and seeing one of these creatures along the shoreline; which happens from time to time.

The Yorke Peninsula

The Yorke Peninsula is THE place for family holidays. Never heard of it? Well then get your pen out and start jotting some of these down because we’ll guarantee you that when your kids hear about this, they’ll be begging to go.

Equipment Hire

Pack your bathers and some sunscreen because there’s plenty to hire when you’re down in the Yorke Peninsula. There’s everything from kayaking and jet skis to free bicycle and boat hire.

Not all of us have the luxury of owning their own kayak or jet ski, but man does it look fun! You don’t have to miss out because along this coast you’ll find equipment and boat hire in plentiful supply. Just make sure you’re careful when you’re zipping along the beach.

Family activities

The Yorke Peninsula is a great destination for families looking to beat the heat or spend a weekend relaxing. Sometimes though the beach gets a bit stale, the kids start complaining, and everyone wants to do something ‘fun’.

Splash Towner Water Park is one of the most popular water parks in the area and is suitable for all ages. The kids will love – water slides, tipping buckets and play equipment that might just give you a few hours to rest as they play to their heart’s content.

Have you ever thought that trains are sometimes a bit too big? Well, you’re in luck with the Copper Coast Rail, a miniature train system that can take adults and children along a cute little track. So don’t worry about having eaten too much fish and chips last night because that’s possible.

Golf

A coastline holiday doesn’t mean you have to give up your weekend golfing, and what better way to indulge your favourite past time than doing it by the coast. There are many golf clubs in and around the Yorke Peninsula that offer 9 and 18 hole courses.

Look, we get it, you blokes like a good golf session and if you can convince your better half to give you a few hours of peace and quiet, then you’re in luck. Nothing beats golf, and there’s no better way to golf than looking out onto the horizon and seeing the ocean.

Next Steps

The South Australian peninsula offers everything from seafood to surfing. It’s the place to go for aquatic sports or a weekend of relaxation. You can save time and money with a camper trailer from Mars Campers that has everything you need for a camping trip and is easy to set up and take down. Contact us today, and one of the members of the Mars team will help you.

Mars Campers CTA